1 Vuzuru

Genitourinary Disorders Case Study 52 Mosby

1. Griffiths CE, Barker JN. Pathogenesis and clinical features of psoriasis. Lancet 2007;370:263–71 [PubMed]

2. Gudjonsson JE, Elder JT. Psoriasis: epidemiology. Clin Dermatol 2007;25:535–46 [PubMed]

3. Ruiz DG, de Azevedo MN, Santos OL. Psoriatic arthritis: a clinical entity distinct from psoriasis. Rev Bras Rheumatol 2012;52:623–38 [PubMed]

4. Bruce IN. Psoriatic arthritis: clinical features. In: Hochberg MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, editors. eds. Rheumatology. 3rd edn Philadelphia: Mosby, 2003:1241–52

5. Antoni CE. Psoriatic arthritis: etiology and pathogenesis. In: Hochber MC, Silman AJ, Smolen JS, Weinblatt ME, Weisman MH, editors. , eds. Rheumatology. 3rd edn Philadelphia: Mosby, 2003:1253–62

6. McGonagle D, Tan AL, Benjamin M. The nail as musculosketal appendage—implications for an improved understanding of the link between psoriasis and arthritis. Dermatology 2009;218:97–102 [PubMed]

7. Tam LS, Leung YY, Li EK. Psoriatic arthritis in Asia. Rheumatology 2009;48:1473–7 [PubMed]

8. Slobodin G, Rosner I, Rosenbaum M, et al. Psoriatic arthropathy: where now?Isr Med Assoc J 2009;11:430–4 [PubMed]

9. Kane D, Stafford L, Bresnihan B, et al. A prospective, clinical and radiological study of early psoriatic arthritis: an early synovitis clinic experience. Rheumatology 2003;42:1460–8 [PubMed]

10. Gladman DD. Clinical aspects of the spondyloarthropathies. Am J Med Sci 1998;316:234–8 [PubMed]

11. van der Heijde D, Sharp J, Wassenberg S, et al. Psoriatic arthritis imaging: a review of scoring methods. Ann Rheum Dis 2005;64:61–4 [PMC free article][PubMed]

12. Grethe JA. Imaging the spine in arthritis—a pictorial review. Insights Imaging 2011;2:177–91 [PMC free article][PubMed]

13. Jones SM, Armas JB, Cohen MG, et al. Psoriatic arthritis: outcome of disease subsets and relationship of joint disease to nail and skin disease. Br J Rheumatol 1994;33:834–9 [PubMed]

14. Natarajan V, Nath AK, Thappa DM, et al. Coexistence of onychomycosis in psoriatic nails—a descriptive study. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2010;76:723. [PubMed]

15. Bogliolo L, Alpini C, Caporali R, et al. Antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide in psoriatic arthritis. J Rheumatol 2005;32:511–15 [PubMed]

16. Welsing P, Landewé R, van Riel PL, et al. The relationship between disease activity and radiological progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal analysis. Arthritis Rheum 2004;50:2082–93 [PubMed]

17. Ory PA, Gladman DD, Mease PJ. Psoriatic arthritis and imaging. Ann Rheum Dis 2004;64:55–7 [PMC free article][PubMed]

18. Gossec L, Smolen JS, Gaujoux-Viala C, et al. European league against rheumatism recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies. Ann Rheum Dis 2012;71:4–12 [PubMed]

19. Wong K, Gladman DD, Husted J, et al. Mortality studies in psoriatic arthritis: results from a single outpatient clinic. I. Causes and risk of death. Arthritis Rheum 1997;40:1868–72 [PubMed]

20. Gladman DD, Farewell VT, Wong K, et al. Mortality studies in psoriatic arthritis: results from a single center. II. Prognostic indicators for death. Arthritis Rheum 1998;41:1103–10 [PubMed]

CHAPTER 5 GENITOURINARY DISORDERS CASE STUDY 55  1.What can you tell S.M. about his lab work? I would tell SM that his vitals are normal. S.M.’s Sodium Potassium ,Chloride Bicarbonate, BUN ,Creatinine , Glucose,  RBC, WBC, Hgb-HctPlatelets, and Urinalysis all cam back within normal ranges for his age and demographic.  However,Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is low.2.What is the significance of the PSA result? Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is 0.23 mg/mL this is low the normal range is  (2.4- 4.0) up to 7.0 in older men. The prostate specific antigen assay was initially developed as a tumor marker (Lewis et. Al,  2014).3. What other specific examination will S.M. need to have along with the PSA? CAS A significant exam that tests forProstate-specific antigen is a digital rectal exam this tests for the size, symmetry and consistency of the prostate gland (Lewis et. Al,  2014).  4.Why did S.M. try taking the saw palmetto, and why do you think he stopped taking it? Palmetto is best known for its use in decreasing symptoms of an enlarged prostate. According to Lewis, side effects may include: nausea, vomiting, and stomach pain. (Lewis et. Al,  2014). 5.S.M. is curious why his enlarged prostate would affect his urination. He is concerned that he has prostate cancer. What would you teach him? I would teach S.M. that he dose not have cancer because of his enlarged prostate. All his labs came back normal except for PSA.

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *