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Mercutio Romeo And Juliet Essay Questions

The Role of Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet Essay examples

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The Role of Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet

In William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, each character plays a specific role in driving the action forward and shaping the play's theme. One secondary character, Mercutio, is essential to the play. Mercutio is the Prince's kinsman, but more importantly, he is Romeo's friend and confidant. Mercutio's concern is always for Romeo and for peace between the two families, the Capulets and the Montagues. Mercutio is the first to see that Romeo is deeply in love. In Act 2, scene 1, Mercutio calls for Romeo by saying, "Romeo! Humors! Madman! Passion! Lover!" He then says, "my invocation is fair and honest, in his mistress' name…." Mercutio shows his…show more content…

Love has already overcome him and controls all of his thoughts and actions. This love prevents Mercutio from saving Romeo and keeping peace between the families. In Act 3, scene 1, Mercutio fights Tybalt on behalf of Romeo and his relationship with Romeo. Romeo attempts to break up the fight, but Tybalt stabs Mercutio. As he is dying, Mercutio says, "A plague o' both your houses! I am sped…." He repeats this phrase twice more before he dies. It is after Mercutio's death that Romeo realizes what will be the consequences of his love affair. This leads Romeo to kill Tybalt, which in turn, leads to his exile and eventual death. Romeo says in line 135 of the same scene, "O, I am fortune's fool." Mercutio was correct in his predictions. The love between Romeo and Juliet ends up a tragedy for both families. Mercutio's character is essential in driving the action forward in this play. He foreshadows the devastating events, serves as Romeo's friend, and gives the audience important information throughout the play. Mercutio's death is the turning point in the play. For all of these reasons, Mercutio is essential to the play.

SUMMARY

Mercutio and Benvolio are discussing the hot day and the possibility of a quarrel. Tybalt enters looking for Romeo and rudely addresses them. Mercutio and Tybalt are about to fight when Romeo

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Romeo and Juliet: Essay Topics

1) Discuss the character of Romeo and his infatuation with Rosaline. Does this weaken the credibility of the love he feels for Juliet?

2) Friar Laurence serves many dramatic purposes in the play. Examine the Friar and his role in Romeo and Juliet.

3) Mercutio is considered to be one of Shakespeare's great creations, yet he is killed relatively early in the play. What makes Mercutio so memorable a character?

4) Examine the role of women in Romeo and Juliet.

5) Romeo and Juliet are referred to as "star-cross'd lovers". Discuss the concept of predetermined destiny and how it relates to the play.

6) Discuss Juliet's soliloquy that opens Act 3, Scene 2, paying particular attention to its poetic merits and relevance to the overall play.

7) Many references are made to time in the play. Discuss the passage of time throughout Romeo and Juliet.

8) What sets Romeo and Juliet apart from Shakespeare's other great tragedies? In particular, what differentiates the young lovers from other Shakespearean heroes like Othello, Macbeth, and Hamlet?

9) Mercutio gives a wonderful monologue on Queen Mab in Act 1, Scene 4. Examine this passage and discuss its literary qualities. Of what significance is Mercutio's speech to the overall play?

10) Juliet's suitor Paris is compared throughout the play to Romeo. Examine carefully the similarities and differences between the two young men who love Juliet.


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