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Educations Purpose Is To Replace An Empty Mind Essays

Paulo Freire was a Brazilian ideologist whose radical ideas have shaped the modern concept of and approaches to education. In his essay The 'Banking' Concept of Education, Freire passionately expounds on the mechanical flaw in the current system, and offers an approach that he believes medicates the learning-teaching disorder in the classroom. The flawed conception, Freire explains, is the oppressive “depositing” of information (hence the term 'banking') by teachers into their students.

But, according to Freire, a “liberating” educational practice (his problem-posing method) negates the unconsciousness of those in classroom roles, and no false intellectual stimulation can exist within that practice. On the contrary, in any case, the student is responsible for understanding the material one way or another depending on what style the teacher adapts, even if the content is un-relatable to the students’ lives. If a teacher has a certain premeditated lesson, then there can be no true independence on behalf of the student, because both the banking and problem-posing concepts are anti-autonomous.

The “banking concept,” as termed by Freire, is essentially an act that hinders the intellectual growth of students by turning them into, figuratively speaking, comatose “receptors” and “collectors” of information that have no real connection to their lives. Freire states:

"Implicit in the banking concept is the assumption of a dichotomy between human beings and the world: a person is merely in the world, not with the world or with others; the individual is a spectator, not re-creator. In this view the person is not a conscious being (corpo consciente); he or she is rather the possessor of a consciousness: an empty “mind” passively open to the reception of deposits of reality from the world outside" (247).

What Freire means by this is that the banking concept imposes a schism between a person (teacher and/or student) and the “real world”, resulting in the evident demise of his or her true consciousness, since the former can only be realized through the relationships and connections the individual draws from the material to their life.

In this view, Freire claims that by assuming the roles of teachers as depositors and students as receptors, the banking concept thereby changes humans into objects. Humans (as objects) have no autonomy and therefore no ability to rationalize and conceptualize knowledge at a personal level. And because of this initial misunderstanding, the method itself is a system of oppression and control.

To alleviate this “dehumanization” produced by the banking concept, Freire introduces what is deemed as “problem-posing education”. In this approach the roles of students and teachers become less structured, and both engage in acts of dialogic enrichment to effectively ascertain knowledge from each other. According to Freire, “Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient, continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other” (244).

This means that true comprehension can only be fashioned though conversation, questioning, and sharing of one’s interpretations by all persons in the classroom. Within this concept Freire calls for an equal playing field, or what one of my former teachers called “mutual humanity”: “It [problem-posing education] enables teachers and students to become Subjects of the educational process by overcoming authoritarianism and an alienating intellectualism” (253-254). However, Freire failed to observe that incessantly within the apparatus of a classroom there is an imbalanced power structure between the teacher and the students. For all intents and purposes, the teacher is always an authority, no matter what.

However, inherent in the problem-posing method is a two-pronged line of attack, meaning there are two classroom modes within the one problem-posing method. One is pseudo-dialectic, which is the illusion of students and teachers actually “discovering” knowledge with and from each other, because the teacher poses a question but already has the solution in mind. In this way, the students are directed towards a particular outcome, and do not have independent thought-processes.

The other is genuine dialectic, meaning the teacher poses a question with no intention of steering the dialogue towards a single answer. Depending on the amount of experience the teacher has under their belt, they can expect a certain percentage of the possible answers, but it is the remaining percent of answers, which they had never actually considered, that they in fact take interest in.

Freire asserted, “If it is true that thought has meaning only when generated by action upon the world, the subordination of students to teachers becomes impossible” (247). What this means is that passive “learning” thwarts true consciousness, which then means no active imagination can be produced in which action is facilitated. In view of the fact that “mock” problem-posing education does not necessitate agency on behalf of the students, then the method is, too, ineffective at facilitating consciousness that precedes reflection, which can therefore not be acted upon.

Hence this method does not grant the students “liberation”, and their so-called independence is but an illusion. (Let it be known that for the sake of argument the ideas of “illusion” and “reality” are taken loosely to reflect the nature of different educational methods, not the nature of the ideas themselves).

On the flipside, genuine problem-posing diminishes a teacher’s authority to a level that does not obstruct the exchange of ideas. Necessary participation, attendance, effort in assignments, and so on and so forth are indeed authoritative, however within the classroom dialogue there is a natural conversation that is not hindered by authoritativeness. At this point it is necessary to consider the nature of freedom: the difference between being free and being free of. True freedom is profound; can anyone ever truly be free? In this case of genuine problem-posing, the student is free of the oppression of limiting intellectualism inherent in banking and pseudo-dialectic.

In essence, the Freirian spectrum- with “banking” at one end, pseudo “problem-posing” at the center (which essentially is a form of banking) and genuine “problem-posing” at the other end- mimics the real world in that one is always subject to some degree of authority. The dynamics of those relationships depend on how much each party is willing to give and take, meaning to what degrees the authority renounces their control and the subject allows them.

The notion that students believe they are granted true independence in a classroom has consequences in and on the world at large. Illusory freedom is disastrous because it is a belief in something that is not truth- it does not exist. Therefore students become part of the “real world” believing they know all simply because they were under the impression they were free when they “learned” it. In reality, the students had never discovered what was true for them, and consequently were led to accept an idea and regard it as true without question.

In the instance of true dialectic, the student regards the minimal authority as a non-threat, whereby the student then becomes the final authority on their convictions. In the real world, this is instrumental in fostering a society of enlightened, open-minded and independent persons. Freire elucidates:

"In problem-posing education, people develop their power to perceive critically the way they exist in the world with which and in which they find themselves; they come to see the world not as a static reality, but as a reality in process, in transformation. Although the dialectical relations of women and men with the world exist independently of how these relations are perceived (or whether or not they are perceived at all), it is also true that the form of action they adopt is to a large extent a function of how they perceive themselves in the world. Hence, the teacher-student and the students-teachers reflect simultaneously on themselves and the world without dichotomizing this reflection from action, and thus establish an authentic form of thought and action" (252).

What Freire means is that problem-posing is dynamic because, according to the text, reality is in a continuous state of change. He is saying that although the actual dialogue subsists whether or not the subjects recognize the true nature of reality, their actions are formed by their perceptions of their own reality. The revolutionary component of problem-posing is when both the teacher-student and student-teacher contemplate their own “realities” and are then empowered to imagine otherwise.

Because of and through this imagination, the teacher-student and student-teacher act upon those considerations, and thus revolutionize the current reality and “advance humanity”. The authentic form of thought and action produced by genuine problem-posing is the key to human progression: by placing oneself in the timeline of humanity to learn from the past, examining one’s life in relation to the present while questioning everything, and moving onward to shape the future while never ceasing to idly negate those lessons.

Education in the post-modern society has become the backbone, the foundation for the persons of that society that will one day hold the reigns. The future of humanity is closely linked to the individuals produced by education, and the methodological circumstances in which that intellectual transformation took place. Necessary to the future is an attention to the present in which we vow to set genuine, dialectical education as the bar to initiate advancement, and search for the rebirth of imagination.


Freire, Paulo. “The “Banking” Concept of Education.” Ways of Reading. 8th ed. Bartholomae, David and Anthony Petrosky. Boston: Bedford- St. Martin’s, 2008. 242-254. Print.

Freire, Paulo. “The “Banking” Concept of Education.” Ways of Reading. 8th ed. Bartholomae, David and Anthony Petrosky. Boston: Bedford- St. Martin’s, 2008. 242-254. Print.

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Education is very necessary for each and everyone in order to improve knowledge, way of living as well as social and economic status throughout the life. Getting proper education is the birth rights of everyone restricting which is the crime. Education is the ultimate way to get victory over all the personal and social problems. We have listed some effective, motivational and inspiring quotes and quotations about the education said by the famous and popular personalities of the world.

Quotes on Education

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” – Nelson Mandela

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.” – Aristotle

“Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.” – John Dewey

“Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.” – George Washington Carver

“My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy. That some people, unable to go to school, were more educated and more intelligent than college professors.” – Maya Angelou

“It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” – Aristotle

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” – Benjamin Franklin

“The whole purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows.” – Sydney J. Harris

“The purpose of education is to replace an empty mind with an open one.” – Malcolm Forbes

“The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.” – Carl Rogers

“Education is the movement from darkness to light.” – Allan Bloom

“Education is the best friend. An educated person is respected everywhere. Education beats the beauty and the youth.” – Chanakya

“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” – William Butler Yeats

“The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge and the dissemination of truth.” – John F. Kennedy

“Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.” – Oscar Wilde

“The philosophy of the school room in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next.” – Abraham Lincoln

“A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.” – Theodore Roosevelt

“You are always a student, never a master. You have to keep moving forward.” – Conrad Hall

“Education is learning what you didn’t even know you didn’t know.” – Daniel J. Boorstin

“Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.” – Robert Frost

“The direction in which education starts a man will determine his future in life.” – Plato

“In the first place, God made idiots. That was for practice. Then he made school boards.” – Mark Twain

“The most influential of all educational factors is the conversation in a child’s home.” – William Temple

“Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.” – Albert Einstein

“The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education.” – Albert Einstein

“Nine tenths of education is encouragement.” – Anatole France

“Learning is a result of listening, which in turn leads to even better listening and attentiveness to the other person. In other words, to learn from the child, we must have empathy, and empathy grows as we learn.” – Alice Miller

“Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another.” – Gilbert K. Chesterton

‘The illiterate of the future will not be the person who cannot read. It will be the person who does not know how to learn.” – Alvin Toffler

“It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.” – Albert Einstein

“Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another.” – Gilbert K. Chesterton

“The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who’ll get me a book I ain’t read.” – Abraham Lincoln

“It is with children that we have the best chance of studying the development of logical knowledge, mathematical knowledge, physical knowledge, and so forth.” – Jean Piaget

“Men and women must be educated, in a great degree, by the opinions and manners of the society they live in.” – Mary Wollstonecraft

“A library is the delivery room for the birth of ideas, a place where history comes to life.” – Norman Cousins

“He who opens a school door, closes a prison.” – Victor Hugo

“Change is the end result of all true learning.” – Leo Buscaglia

“Develop a passion for learning. If you do, you will never cease to grow.” – Anthony J. D’Angelo

“If I were again beginning my studies, I would follow the advice of Plato and start with mathematics.” – Galileo Galilei

“He that loves reading has everything within his reach.” – William Godwin

“I would rather entertain and hope that people learned something than educate people and hope they were entertained.” – Walt Disney

“To educate a man in mind and not in morals is to educate a menace to society.” – Theodore Roosevelt

“Intellectual growth should commence at birth and cease only at death.” – Albert Einstein

“Much education today is monumentally ineffective. All too often we are giving young people cut flowers when we should be teaching them to grow their own plants.” – John W. Gardner

“The foundation of every state is the education of its youth.” – Diogenes

“Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” – Maimonides

“Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and diligence.” – Abigail Adams

“Reading, after a certain age, diverts the mind too much from its creative pursuits. Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.” – Albert Einstein

“The great aim of education is not knowledge but action.” – Herbert Spencer

“Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.” – Will Durant

“Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government.” – Thomas Jefferson

“No one has yet realized the wealth of sympathy, the kindness and generosity hidden in the soul of a child. The effort of every true education should be to unlock that treasure.” – Emma Goldman

“Don’t limit a child to your own learning, for he was born in another time.” – Rabindranath Tagore

“The paradox of education is precisely this – that as one begins to become conscious one begins to examine the society in which he is being educated.” – James A. Baldwin

“I am often amazed at how much more capability and enthusiasm for science there is among elementary school youngsters than among college students.” – Carl Sagan

“All I want is an education, and I am afraid of no one.” – Malala Yousafzai

“The paradox of education is precisely this – that as one begins to become conscious one begins to examine the society in which he is being educated.” – James A. Baldwin

“To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting.” – Edmund Burke

“Your library is your paradise.” – Desiderius Erasmus

“Education is all a matter of building bridges.” – Ralph Ellison

“Poor people cannot rely on the government to come to help you in times of need. You have to get your education. Then nobody can control your destiny.” – Charles Barkley

“Good teaching is one-fourth preparation and three-fourths pure theatre.” – Gail Godwin

“I will get my education – if it is in home, school, or anyplace.” – Malala Yousafzai

“It is a thousand times better to have common sense without education than to have education without common sense.” – Robert Green Ingersoll

“Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body.” – Marcus Tullius Cicero

“A human being is not attaining his full heights until he is educated.” – Horace Mann

“If the education of our kids comes from radio, television, newspapers – if that’s where they get most of their knowledge from, and not from the schools, then the powers that be are definitely in charge, because they own all those outlets.” – Maynard James Keenan

“The object of education is to prepare the young to educate themselves throughout their lives.” – Robert M. Hutchins

“An education isn’t how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It’s being able to differentiate between what you know and what you don’t.” – Anatole France

“Children have to be educated, but they have also to be left to educate themselves.” – Ernest Dimnet

“Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body.” – Marcus Tullius Cicero

“It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.” – Oscar Wilde

“Education… has produced a vast population able to read but unable to distinguish what is worth reading.” – G. M. Trevelyan

“An educated person is one who has learned that information almost always turns out to be at best incomplete and very often false, misleading, fictitious, mendacious – just dead wrong.” – Russell Baker

“From kindergarten to graduation, I went to public schools, and I know that they are a key to being sure that every child has a chance to succeed and to rise in the world.” – Dick Cheney

“A child miseducated is a child lost.” – John F. Kennedy

“Education alone can conduct us to that enjoyment which is, at once, best in quality and infinite in quantity.” – Horace Mann

“To the extent that we are all educated and informed, we will be more equipped to deal with the gut issues that tend to divide us.” – Caroline Kennedy

“Data is not information, information is not knowledge, knowledge is not understanding, understanding is not wisdom.” – Clifford Stoll

“The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, And all the sweet serenity of books.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“Education is a better safeguard of liberty than a standing army.” – Edward Everett

“Resolve to edge in a little reading every day, if it is but a single sentence. If you gain fifteen minutes a day, it will make itself felt at the end of the year.” – Horace Mann

“If I had learned education I would not have had time to learn anything else.” – Cornelius Vanderbilt

“I prefer the company of peasants because they have not been educated sufficiently to reason incorrectly.” – Michel de Montaigne

“Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten.” – B. F. Skinner

“I cannot live without books.” – Thomas Jefferson

“Academic qualifications are important and so is financial education. They’re both important and schools are forgetting one of them.” – Robert Kiyosaki

“A liberal education is at the heart of a civil society, and at the heart of a liberal education is the act of teaching.” – A. Bartlett Giamatti

“I read Shakespeare and the Bible, and I can shoot dice. That’s what I call a liberal education.” – Tallulah Bankhead

“Responsibility educates.” – Wendell Phillips

“I read Shakespeare and the Bible, and I can shoot dice. That’s what I call a liberal education.” – Tallulah Bankhead

“Why should society feel responsible only for the education of children, and not for the education of all adults of every age?” – Erich Fromm

“Real education must ultimately be limited to men who insist on knowing, the rest is mere sheep-herding.” – Ezra Pound

“I need to complete my homework on time.” – Malala Yousafzai

“It is only as we develop others that we permanently succeed.” – Harvey S. Firestone

“What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to the soul.” – Joseph Addison

“No man who worships education has got the best out of education… Without a gentle contempt for education no man’s education is complete.” – Gilbert K. Chesterton

“Since we cannot know all that there is to be known about anything, we ought to know a little about everything.” – Blaise Pascal

“I think everyone should go to college and get a degree and then spend six months as a bartender and six months as a cabdriver. Then they would really be educated.” – Al McGuire

“Rewards and punishments are the lowest form of education.” – Zhuangzi

“Education is the transmission of civilization.” – Will Durant

“The great difficulty in education is to get experience out of ideas.” – George Santayana

“An educated people can be easily governed.” – Frederick the Great

“The more that learn to read the less learn how to make a living. That’s one thing about a little education. It spoils you for actual work. The more you know the more you think somebody owes you a living.” – Will Rogers

“The only real failure in life is one not learned from.” – Anthony J. D’Angelo

“Education is hanging around until you’ve caught on.” – Robert Frost

“To me education is a leading out of what is already there in the pupil’s soul. To Miss Mackay it is a putting in of something that is not there, and that is not what I call education. I call it intrusion.” – Muriel Spark

“An educated man is thoroughly inoculated against humbug, thinks for himself and tries to give his thoughts, in speech or on paper, some style.” – Alan K. Simpson

“You can educate yourself right out of a relationship with God.” – Tammy Faye Bakker

“Education is neither eastern nor western.” – Malala Yousafzai

“Every educated person is a future enemy.” – Martin Bormann

“Education is the cheap defense of nations.” – Edmund Burke

“Education, n.: That which discloses to the wise and disguises from the foolish their lack of understanding.” – Ambrose Bierce

“Education is for improving the lives of others and for leaving your community and world better than you found it.” – Marian Wright Edelman

“The education of a man is never completed until he dies.” – Robert E. Lee

“I believe that education is all about being excited about something. Seeing passion and enthusiasm helps push an educational message.” – Steve Irwin

“Education, therefore, is a process of living and not a preparation for future living.” – John Dewey

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” – Mahatma Gandhi

“Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper or your self-confidence.” – Robert Frost

“It is better to learn late than never.” – Publilius Syrus

“My mother was the most beautiful woman I ever saw. All I am I owe to my mother. I attribute all my success in life to the moral, intellectual and physical education I received from her.” – George Washington

“The aim of education is the knowledge, not of facts, but of values.” – William S. Burroughs

“Education is what remains after one has forgotten what one has learned in school.” – Albert Einstein

“Education is the key to success in life, and teachers make a lasting impact in the lives of their students.” – Solomon Ortiz

“Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family.” – Kofi Annan

“Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune.” – Jim Rohn

“Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.” – Malcolm X

“There is no end to education. It is not that you read a book, pass an examination, and finish with education. The whole of life, from the moment you are born to the moment you die, is a process of learning.” – Jiddu Krishnamurti

“Music is the movement of sound to reach the soul for the education of its virtue.” – Plato

“All real education is the architecture of the soul.” – William Bennett

“Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education.” – Franklin D. Roosevelt

“I no have education. I have inspiration. If I was educated, I would be a damn fool.” – Bob Marley

“Without education, your children can never really meet the challenges they will face. So it’s very important to give children education and explain that they should play a role for their country.” – Nelson Mandela

“Education is the key to the future: You’ve heard it a million times, and it’s not wrong. Educated people have higher wages and lower unemployment rates, and better-educated countries grow faster and innovate more than other countries. But going to college is not enough. You also have to study the right subjects.” – Alex Tabarrok

“For good nurture and education implant good constitutions.” – Plato

“The internet could be a very positive step towards education, organisation and participation in a meaningful society.” – Noam Chomsky

“Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him.” – John Locke

“The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” – Jean Piaget

“There are many problems, but I think there is a solution to all these problems; it’s just one, and it’s education.” – Malala Yousafzai

“Education is a weapon whose effects depend on who holds it in his hands and at whom it is aimed.” – Joseph Stalin

“We discovered that education is not something which the teacher does, but that it is a natural process which develops spontaneously in the human being.” – Maria Montessori

“We are born weak, we need strength; helpless, we need aid; foolish, we need reason. All that we lack at birth, all that we need when we come to man’s estate, is the gift of education.” – Jean-Jacques Rousseau

“Education is that whole system of human training within and without the school house walls, which molds and develops men.” – W. E. B. Du Bois

“Creativity is the key to success in the future, and primary education is where teachers can bring creativity in children at that level.” – A. P. J. Abdul Kalam

“Our future growth relies on competitiveness and innovation, skills and productivity… and these in turn rely on the education of our people.” – Julia Gillard

“The greatest education in the world is watching the masters at work.” – Michael Jackson

“If you want to get laid, go to college. If you want an education, go to the library.” – Frank Zappa

“A quality education grants us the ability to fight the war on ignorance and poverty.” – Charles B. Rangel

“Until we get equality in education, we won’t have an equal society.” – Sonia Sotomayor

“When you have strict censorship of the internet, young students cannot receive a full education. Their view of the world is imbalanced. There can be no true discussion of the issues.” – Ai Weiwei

“Access to computers and the Internet has become a basic need for education in our society.” – Kent Conrad

“I am what I am thanks to my mother, my father, my brother, my sister… because they have given me everything. The education I have is thanks to them.” – Ronaldinho

“Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.” – Aristotle

‘Education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil.” – C. S. Lewis

“At the bottom of education, at the bottom of politics, even at the bottom of religion, there must be for our race economic independence.” – Booker T. Washington

“Good manners will open doors that the best education cannot.” – Clarence Thomas

“Education then, beyond all other devices of human origin, is the great equalizer of the conditions of men, the balance-wheel of the social machinery.” – Horace Mann

“The highest education is that which does not merely give us information but makes our life in harmony with all existence.” – Rabindranath Tagore

“The highest result of education is tolerance.” – Helen Keller

“The very spring and root of honesty and virtue lie in good education.” – Plutarch

“Education is a shared commitment between dedicated teachers, motivated students and enthusiastic parents with high expectations.” – Bob Beauprez

“Ensuring quality higher education is one of the most important things we can do for future generations.” – Ron Lewis

“Education remains the key to both economic and political empowerment.” – Barbara Jordan

“Establishing lasting peace is the work of education; all politics can do is keep us out of war.” – Maria Montessori

“Inclusive, good-quality education is a foundation for dynamic and equitable societies.” – Desmond Tutu

 

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